The Bear Facts

No such thing as ‘too dramatic’

Theatre+Director+Clark+Reed+and+his+Thespian+performers+compete+at+the+Renaissance+Festival.
Theatre Director Clark Reed and his Thespian performers compete at the Renaissance Festival.

Theatre Director Clark Reed and his Thespian performers compete at the Renaissance Festival.

Theatre Director Clark Reed and his Thespian performers compete at the Renaissance Festival.

Zoee Rogers, Writer

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They can look like anyone, sit in the cafeteria for lunch, complain about the English assignment, or even make that famous “brain freeze!” face. They are high school students, classmates, performers, and more. They are the members of LCM’s Thespian Society.

Thespians is an honors theatre organization that is a part of the International Thespian Society. Responsibilities of members include being involved with all LCM productions, including the UIL One Act Play competition, and attending as many meetings and theatre events as possible. These individuals also help in the community through service projects and aiding local theatre organizations such as the Orange Community Players, the Port Arthur Little Theatre and the Beaumont Community Players.

“Being able to help others is really rewarding, especially within the community and surrounding theatre groups,” junior Dalton Teeler said.

Many students will join Thespians by the end of the semester. To qualify for induction, students will need to attend meetings and earn a required amount of points by participating in theatrical productions.

“Any theatre student that wants to be involved can be,” theatre director Clark Reed said.

While being a part of the Thespians Society includes an assortment of responsibilities, it also offers some perks. These actors and actresses get to travel to the annual State Thespian Convention held in Dallas, Texas every December. It is there that Thespians will be able to attend workshops on varying components of theatre, all the way from acting to technical theatre and all which lies between. These workshops are led and operated by college professors and professionals from a wide array of fields.

In addition to the specialized lessons, thespians also get the opportunity to audition for college/university programs and scholarships. On top of that, a thespian may take advantage of the ability to compete at the convention as an individual, possibly qualifying to perform at the National Convention held in Lincoln, Nebraska.

“This year will be my first time going to the convention,” soon-to-be-inducted junior Ashley Knight said. “The prospect of being able to learn from professionals and even perform is really exciting. I’m looking forward to the experience.”

Recently, the Thespians competed at the Texas Renaissance Festival School Days, which took place in Todd Mission, TX. The young performers brought their pieces to life outside, with no electricity, sound amplification, or special effects. Only Renaisssance Era costumes were permitted, along with a bench for the stage, mirroring the experience one would have had in Shakespeare’s day and age.

“Tyler Regan, Mariah Blair, Cade Bonin, and Ashley Knight placed third in Group Acting with their scene from Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing,'” Reed said. “Dalton Teeler and Lucas Ridout placed second in Duet Acting with their scene from Shakespeare’s ‘Comedy of Errors’, and Jennifer Ellis and Ashlyn Ellis placed third in Duet Acting with their scene from Shakespeare’s ‘Two Gentlemen of Verona.'”

In addition to paying homage to the theatre practices of the time, the group of young actors/actresses were also able to see for themselves how life was back then. Artisans, craftsmen, and performers of all kinds served as a moving flashback to the 1500’s.

“The Renaissance festival also offers a unique look into that historical time period,” Reed said. “[You] get the opportunity to see how people lived before the conveniences of modern technology.”

In the next few months, all of Reed’s productions students will be focusing on the UIL One Act Play competition. Everyone is working towards qualifying for state this year and hopefully advancing further.

“I’m very proud of my students,” Reed said. “Little do they know I only offer them the opportunity for success. They do the rest.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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No such thing as ‘too dramatic’