• Student orientations will be held on Aug. 21

  • First day of classes is Aug. 28

  • "Meet the Bears" is Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. at the stadium

  • Have a great summer!

The student newspaper of Little Cypress-Mauriceville High School

The Bear Facts

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Long live clean beaches

There was an abundance of trash left behind to spoil on Crystal Beach after spring break.

Wendy Brandon

There was an abundance of trash left behind to spoil on Crystal Beach after spring break.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






We face many diverse challenges when it comes to a clean, clear, and healthy ocean, but one problem is simple to understand: trash. Every year, people are carelessly damaging the oceans and seas. They’re filling them with eight million tons of plastic, metal, and paper. That is enough waste to wrap around the world three and a half times.

Unfortunately, what we see dirtying our beaches and lurking on the ocean’s surface is just the tip of the iceberg. Much more lies unseen beneath the surface and far away in the vast open water, but that doesn’t make it any less important. That’s why more and more people are taking bold action. They’re working to stop the flow of trash at the source before it has the chance to reach the water to entangle dolphins, endanger sea turtles, or depress our valuable beaches.

Marine debris is not only unpleasing to the eye; it is dangerous to sea life. Birds, turtles, marine mammals, fish, and other marine life can mistake floating trash for food. If it’s eaten, it will choke them, in turn blocking their internal systems. Larger debris, such as nets or plastic rings, can kill animals by strangling them or can prevent them from swimming, diving, or searching for food. Smaller trash creates an even bigger threat. They absorb toxic chemicals, which can cause cancers that weaken the immune systems of the animals, making them more open to receiving diseases and other infections.

Plastics spread throughout the ocean pose more of a threat than people think. As styrofoam breaks into smaller parts, the components in it sink lower in the ocean and spread around the seafloor. Not only do the chemicals in plastic affect the ocean, but they soak up other toxins before entering the water. As these chemicals are eaten by animals in the ocean, this is not great for human health either.

Chemicals from plastics like lead, cadmium, and mercury have been found in many edible fish in the ocean, which is very dangerous for humans. Other toxins in debris are directly linked to cancers, birth defects, immune system problems, and childhood developmental issues. We as humans will ingest the contaminated fish, unknowingly absorbing the toxins into our digestive systems; this causes many diseases and cancerous plagues inside the body that can be deadly.

Marine debris is an overall threat to our environment, our animals, and ourselves. So if you ever plan to go to the beach for vacation or a national holiday, please always remember to pick up your trash. Help clear any debris you see in order maintain a clean, clear, and healthy ocean.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Long live clean beaches

    Features

    New principal reflects on school year

  • Long live clean beaches

    News

    Choir to present spring concert

  • Long live clean beaches

    Showcase

    Golf teams win district, prepare for Regionals

  • Long live clean beaches

    Showcase

    Lady Bears fight through district play

  • Long live clean beaches

    Opinions

    Reasons why you should stop and think

  • Long live clean beaches

    Features

    Faith around the fire

  • Long live clean beaches

    News

    One Act Play to compete at Regionals

  • Long live clean beaches

    News

    Seniors to compete for title of Miss Honey

  • Long live clean beaches

    News

    Student’s truck catches fire

  • Long live clean beaches

    Showcase

    Tennis takes home medals from district meet

The student newspaper of Little Cypress-Mauriceville High School
Long live clean beaches